Review: Tower of Dawn by Sarah J. Maas

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★★★★✩

(actual rating 4.25 stars)

This is a freaking long review but there are no spoilers for this book and very minor spoilers for the rest of the series.

After the disaster that was ACOWAR, I was really scared of this book. I know, I know, ACOWAR is another world, another trilogy, whatever, but the thing is my taste has changed in the past year and my worst fear was that the last two books in the Throne of Glass series would be ruined for me because I don’t like the author anymore. Fortunately, I found that that wasn’t true (at least not of this book), but I also had some problems with it.

The thing you have to know about me is that Throne of Glass is what got me into YA high fantasy. Back when I should have been an experienced reader already, but I actually didn’t know anything about show-don’t-tell or any of the basic rules of writing, back when I didn’t realize that killing a POC character is a pretty shitty thing to do (hello if you’re not in the US you just don’t know these things). So I loved the first books and I’ve reread them enough times that I fortunately don’t have to do it anymore, because if I did I know I would have to massively lower my rating. The world of Throne of Glass means so much to me and even if I’m far from the reader I was when I used to say “sjm can do no wrong” and I kind of don’t like the main characters anymore, I still love the feeling of this world and its side characters so much.

I didn’t write the previous paragraph to justify why I have a “problematic fave”, but because I think it’s relevant to my review. If you’re somehow reading this without having read the rest of ToG and see my mostly positive review about this, it’s still very likely that you might not want to start this series, because I’m mostly biased when it comes to it. I’m not telling anyone “read this” or “don’t read this”, but just keep in mind that nostalgia plays a big role sometimes when judging later books in a series.

Despite everything, I also think I’m fairly objective when reviewing this in all its parts, so we can move on from this long premise.

➻ Is reading this book necessary before reading the next one? 
Well, I obviously haven’t read the next one, but I do believe that if you’re planning to finish this series you should read this. I have no doubt that the discoveries that Chaol, Yrene, Nesryn and Sartaq made will be thoroughly summarized in Throne of Glass #7, but that’s still all they’ll ever be: summaries. There is a certain eerie feeling to both major discoveries that take place in this book, and that’s one of the things where I feel SJM’s writing excels. And even if the discoveries themselves could be summarized in a few sentences, they are so deeply interwoven with the world building and the history of this fantasy world that I fully believe all the “side info” revealed will somehow come back to bite our ass in the last book. So, bottom line, if you plan to continue the series, read this book.

➻ World building 
I’ve said it before, but world building is something SJM is very good at. She knows her worlds and she knows when to give snippets of info that will come back later, and she knows when and how to unload a reveal on you.

I wouldn’t say there was any big infodump, but we are in a different continent than the one we’re used to, and one that is very very different from what we’ve seen so far, so there were a couple of explanations about its culture and society. I can’t speak for the types of cultures that she drew inspiration from, but the society and world felt rich and well researched, and it was interesting to see the cultural shock Chaol went through on a couple of occasions.

Besides that, a lot of the new information we get has to do with all the continents we’ve seen so far, not just this one. Things we thought we knew from the ancient past are explored again and not everything is how we thought it was.

And speaking of the Southern Continent, here’s what you need to know: we’ve had three books to get used to the Fae and the Valg, to the point where they’ve become normalized (especially the Fae). But there are no Fae in the Southern Continent, or there haven’t been for many years. There is magic, specifically the magic of the healers, but they’re all human women. The Fae are still as mysterious to these people as they were to us in the first two books of this series, so to see the people from the Southern Continent ask about the Fae is like jumping back to years ago when you first read ToG and CoM and you felt that aura of mystery around the Fae.

Especially because a lot of the new information our characters find has to with a past that is so ancient that it helps us regain a little bit of focus. It’s kind of a “wtf” moment when you realize the Fae have been there since who freaking knows when, and it’s a good reminder of how ancient they are, not any single one of them specifically but as a whole. And it reminds you how small and ephemeral these human civilizations are. They’re talking about new rules they had like the abolishment of slavery like they’re been there for a long time, but then you realize it’s merely been decades and compared to the Fae and the Valg humans are so ridiculously tiny.

It’s not just that she tells us, but it’s how she tells us, and that’s absolutely something SJM’s writing does well. Sure, it’s a little over the top sometimes, but when it comes to telling or re-telling the ancient history she manages to create almost an eerie aura that draws you to this world she created and reminds you why you fell in love with it.

➻ Characters 
I love Chaol and I never agreed with those who said SJM ruined him in QoS because he was kind of an asshole. Look, he’s human and everything we knew about his character before then pointed to the fact that he was never gonna be someone who was simply going to accept magic the moment it came back. We spent a whole book without him and I think that was needed. Coming back to a book that is full of purely human characters has been a breath of fresh air and Chaol has had the chance to think about everything that’s happened to him (not just about his injury). His character development in this book, his emotional healing was great to read and it was cathartic to me personally.

It’s not a surprise that SJM can write emotional healing well. It’s what she’s done with Celaena/Aelin and what she’s done with Feyre, and what she’s done with Chaol in this book. Personally I think his development was perfect, he wasn’t emotionally healed because of love but because he learned to see his past from a different perspective and he’s learned to forgive others and most importantly himself.

Yrene was my absolute favorite in TAB, and that’s because she was so different than the characters SJM usually writes. She was….I wouldn’t say “weak”, but she was her own sort of strong while also being fragile and scared and hopeless and stuck. I related a lot to her character and I couldn’t wait to meet her again in this book. So, you ask, you’ve met her again now, was she everything you hoped for?

I still don’t know the answer to this. We meet her 2-3 years later, and she’s made a lot of off-page progress herself, so it makes sense that she’s not the same character we saw in TAB. And I really liked her here as well. I just couldn’t help but feel that SJM fell again in the trap of creating almost every female character like they’re all slightly different version of the same mold. Don’t get me wrong, she’s miles away from Aelin, but you still know right away that SJM created her. And that’s kind of a flaw in my opinion. To me it felt like she didn’t know where to put Yrene in the spectrum that goes from “weak” to “badass” and she kinda had her float around. She was still interesting to read about while I had my nose inside the book, but thinking about it critically, I was a little disappointed in how she wrote her, and it’s probably because of my too-high expectations of her.

I think something similar applies to Nesryn. We didn’t know her much before, but I really liked her in this book and I love how she felt so connected right away to the continent her family came from. It’s just, I feel like she wasn’t a very unique character at all. “Badass woman with a special fighting skill that has always been seen as emotionally unattached but is actually kinda soft inside and falls for a guy” sounds like too many of SJM’s characters.

Other characters are completely new and they consist most of all of the khagan’s children. I think we had a nice diversity of personalities among them and I really enjoyed reading about them and getting to know them. I have a particularly soft spot for both my ruthless lesbian Hasar and her brother Sartaq.

➻ Relationships 
There are two parts of me writing this review right now. The part that mostly enjoyed the two main relationships in this book doesn’t know what to say other than that, because the part of me that’s screaming “BUT IT’S ALL THE SAME” is pretty loud in my head.

I’m going to repeat something I said in my ACOWAR review: SJM is good at building relationships, but she’s awful at writing characters in an established relationship (see Feyre and Rhys in ACOWAR). Here we had two romances building from scratch, so this book was thankfully free of the acowar-syndrome.

I enjoyed both romances, and yet I can’t help but being annoyed at the fact that it’s super obvious from page one (or idk, whenever the characters first meet I guess) who is going to end up with who. It’s something I was scared of before starting the book and while I did not necessarily mind either romance, one of them especially didn’t feel any different than how SJM writes all her romances basically. It’s always the bickering ones that end up together and yeah that’s fun to read I guess but at some point you wish she would write something different.

However, my problem isn’t specific to any romance in itself, it’s more a general annoyance at the fact that every.major.character. has to end up with someone and do it in a very heterosexual way. I’m not even here to complain that there are no mlm or wlw main romances in this book, but how is it possible that out of all the books she’s written, out of 10 main romances (if not more) in ToG alone and out of at least 14 romances if you count all her books, exactly ZERO are wlw or mlm? Look, she can write whatever she wants but it’s so clearly obvious that whenever she introduces a new character they’re gonna end up with someone and this someone is inevitably always of the opposite sex. It would be fucking refreshing to see some more goddamn rep and GOOD REP not like the awful bisexual rep we had in ACOWAR.

The only thing I really like is that she’s not afraid to make and break couples because that’s how life works, but it’s like a single main character can’t exist without a love interest for one fucking month and that’s pretty fucking boring if you look at it.

There is one wlw couple, Hasar and her partner, that is just adorable and for once a good rep, but it’s also an already-established relationship, which feels like a cop-out. “Here’s your rep,” it says, but that’s too easy. It’s like SJM is scared of writing the actual development of a queer couple and I just don’t get it. It’s her books and she can do what she wants but I am also allowed to speak up about it. It’s 2017 and heterosexuality is just not in anymore (I’M JOKING PUT DOWN THE PITCHFORKS).

Also, I wish she stopped putting very not subtle sexual innuendos everywhere and have it be like, the main way that most characters have to flirt with each other. Ugh. Just no. It’s the opposite of hot and just. no. stop.

Something else I wish would stop is the constant use of vocabulary that I feel promotes toxic masculinity. I want to talk about this more in depth in a discussion on my blog sometime in the near future so I’ll leave it at that for now.

➻ Disability rep 
I kept this point for last because I can’t actually talk about it. I’m an able bodied person so I have no right to speak of the rep in this book. All I can say is that at first I thought it was kind of bad until some point, but then it made itself better. I went and looked for reviews of disabled readers and foundthese two reviews that actually say that they felt the rep is pretty good.

I definitely encourage you to read their reviews and find others (I haven’t been able to find more than these but definitely feel free to link some in the comments), and also I would ask to never take the words of a single person when it comes to judging a certain kind of rep. Most of the time these things aren’t a black and white matter, and some readers might be hurt by something that others have found highly empowering. The best thing to do is listen to ownvoices reviewers and not speak above them one way or another.

Have you read Tower of Dawn? What did you think of it?

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Cover reveal: The Rebels Of Gold by Elise Kova

Title: The Rebels of Gold

Series: The Loom Saga (Book Three) – Final book!

Release Date: December 5, 2017

Synopsis:

A new rebellion rises from the still-smoldering remnants of the five guilds of Loom to stand against Dragon tyranny. Meanwhile, on Nova, those same Dragons fight amongst themselves, as age-old power struggles shift the political landscape in fateful and unexpected ways. Unlikely leaders vie for the opportunity to shape a new world order from the perfect clockwork designs of one temperamental engineer.

This is the final installment of USA Today bestselling author Elise Kova’s Loom Saga, THE REBELS OF GOLD will reveal the fate of Loom’s brilliantly contrasting world and its beloved inhabitants.

Books in the Loom Saga:

  1. THE ALCHEMISTS OF LOOM
  2. THE DRAGONS OF NOVA
  3. THE REBELS OF GOLD

 

Preorder Links:

Pre-order THE REBELS OF GOLD from:

AMAZON | BARNES & NOBLE | BOOK DEPOSITORY |
BOOKS A MILLION |

Preorder Swag:

For those who preorder THE REBELS OF GOLD, they can get exclusive swag for submitting their preorder. More info here: http://elisekova.com/pre-order/

The Cover:

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For those who haven’t started this series yet, what are you waiting for? To celebrate the final book in the Loom Saga, the first book, THE ALCHEMISTS OF LOOM, is on sale! The eBook is on sale for $3.99 (regular price – $6.99).

Loom-3-99-Sale-1024x722

AMAZON | BARNES & NOBLE |
IBOOKS | KOBO | GOOGLE PLAY |

Thank you so much to Elise Kova for providing the cover reveal media kit!

ARC Review: The Tiger’s Watch by Julia Ember

I was sent this book as an advance copy by the publisher via NetGalley for reviewing purposes, but all opinions are my own. 

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★★✩✩

DNF @ 45%

How sad. I really wanted to like this book. I was prepared for not loving it, which is fine because not every book can be your favorite, and it’s not even fair to say I completely hated it. If I had more time and if I was a faster reader I would have forced myself to finish this, but alas life is too short and I really swore to myself that if a book needs forcing in order for me to continue reading it, then it’s just not worth it.

The worldbuilding was confusing at best and not all that interesting to me. The concept that one’s soul can be bound (?) to another creature’s is interesting I suppose, but I just didn’t care and just wondered why would someone want or need to do that when if the creature dies you fall in an endless coma (at least that’s how I understood it), like is the benefit only the fact that you get a cat friend? I mean, I’m the biggest lover of cats you can find but still I wouldn’t want my lifespan to severely decrease just so my soul is bound to one, you know?

And I didn’t really understand why everyone was at war, like what’s the point of it all? I feel like nothing was really ever explained (I mean I could have just missed it???).

I could have endured it if it wasn’t for the fact that the more I read the less sense everything the MC, Tashi, did didn’t make sense. Unreasonable (read: stupid) decisions were made just for the sake of creating future drama (that I’ll never get to read, how tragic).

But my biggest problem was the romance. Or the premise to it. Tashi is apparently in love with their best friend but as soon as they see Xian they fall in…lust? with him even tho he’s the Big Bad Guy but oh he’s hot so……… and there was truly no chemistry between the two. Everything was forced and very not subtle, as if the reader needs to be spoonfed a romance they would otherwise never see coming. Spoiler alert: readers can see subtle signs of character development, they are aware of the enemies-to-lovers trope, it’s nothing they haven’t seen before. I am aware that this book is about half the size of the usual standalone fantasy novel, but I am fully convinced that a good slow burn (the only thing that will ever work for an enemies-to-lovers trope, btw) can be written in less than 170 pages.

That’s not what was going on here unfortunately. There was no subtle shift between the good and bad sides of Xian, no deep emotional struggle within Tashi when they realized (TOO SOON) that they were falling for him. This might work for some readers, but it doesn’t for me. Tashi needs to hate Xian for everything he and his people have done and they don’t, so the romance was immediately cancelled in my book, and since that seemed like one of the only things this book had to make it interesting, the whole book was cancelled as well.

The only thing I really liked was the fact that finally we have a genderfluid character in a fantasy world! I think that aspect was done well, though keep in mind that I am not genderfluid myself. However, every review I’ve seen, regardless of the general rating, mentions that Tashi’s identity was portrayed well. There are a few instances of accidental misgendering when another character sees Tashi for the first time, but Tashi’s right pronouns are mentioned right away and nobody actually questions them. There were also a few casual reminders here and there of what Tashi might feel like on a given day (for example they sometimes felt comfortable in men’s clothing and sometimes they didn’t).

Again, to me it just felt like good representation considering what I know about genderfluid people, but I say this as a cis person so I’m really hoping someone who actually is genderfluid will read and review this book to comment on this aspect themselves.

Other than that, this book is a case of “I’ve read too many great books to truly enjoy less-than-average ones”. I am especially picky with my romances and this just wasn’t it for me and I know for a fact that if I had continued reading it with this premise I would have actually hated it, so I chose to stop where I was.


My question for this post is: Do you review and most of all rate books you don’t finish? If you don’t, why? If you do, are there exceptions?

Review: The Loveless Princess by Lilian Bodley

I received an ARC via netgalley but all thoughts are my own.

★★★★

The first thing you should know about this short book is that I kept reading it in the car (don’t worry I was only a passenger!) despite my motion sickness and despite the Pokémon GO event with the 4x candies for your Pokémon buddy, y’feel me?

So I guess what I’m saying is that I was hooked from the first sentence. It’s not that the story was particularly original but it was gripping and really well written and I really wanted to know how the whole aro/ace thing was going to be handled. As it turns out, I think it was done pretty well (I’m not aro/ace but I believe this book is #ownvoices so I have to trust the author on this. Also from previous reads and research I felt like everything was handled well).

The plot was pretty simple but effective and to the point: Princess Anette is forced to marry Prince Everett from another kingdom, her parents won’t hear her reasoning and they don’t believe and don’t understand her when she tries to explain that she’s never loved anyone that way and she truly doesn’t believe that she ever will, and her parents keep telling her that she’ll find happiness through marriage. She reluctantly accepts to be married off because she’s an actual rational person unlike many book MCs and realizes there’s not much she can do that wouldn’t put her and her fiance’s kingdom at risk.
After she’s been married for a couple of days she finds out that her husband actually only loves men (that’s what I was hoping would happen tbh) and has a lover. When she sees them together, she gets mad because she was still holding on to the hope that despite her feelings so far (or lack of romantic feeling) she could grow to love her husband the way people expected her to, but if he loves someone else she sees that tiny hope disappear (I thought that was a bit of a weak plot point, but I actually reread that passage and while it’s a bit sudden and she seems to act a bit OOC I think her reasons actually make some sort of sense). She says some things she doesn’t fully mean, and the prince disappears, so she decides to go on a quest to find him since it was her fault that he disappeared.
This quest is full of fairy tale elements (the whole book actually is. It mentions a lot of tales/myths -some of which I haven’t even been able to identify because I’m not the most knowledgeable person when it comes to those) and the book makes it a point to make you understand that this story is set in such a classic, traditional world.

Now, I think that is great because that means that even in a classic, fairy-tale-like world, where Prince Everett’s grandma is literally the Princess form the Princess and the Pea and his mom is the Princess from Sleeping Beauty, aro/asexual and gay people and all kinds of people can exist and find their own place and they can make this world theirs. I think that’s definitely empowering and important and one of the things that made me like this short story so freaking much.

Another thing that was stressed out almost too much (but I never found like it was repeated too often or in the same context twice) was the idea that love/marriage and happiness aren’t two things that go hand in hand. This is stated in the book because the heroine is aro/ace but I feel like it’s an universal message and too often in books (and in life) there’s this silent acceptance of the equation love=happiness but that couldn’t be further from the truth. Even if you’re not aro/ace, you should reflect on this message because it’s true, you don’t need to find love to be happy (and finding love is nice but it doesn’t automatically make you happy on all fronts).

I’d definitely recommend this book to anyone for all the reasons I stated above (plus if you feel like you don’t know much about aro/asexuality but would like to understand it I feel like this book is a good place to start researching).

TW: attempted rape (I kinda skimmed that part, it wasn’t very graphic I think but it’s still important to point it out)

Review + Discussion: A Court of Wings and Ruin by Sarah J. Maas

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★★★✩

 

This is one of those weird times when I wish star-rating disappeared because I don’t think I’ll ever feel completely comfortable with any rating I might give this book.
I originally gave it 4 stars, as I’m writing this now I think I want to leave out the star-rating completely and just use words instead for once. By the time I finished this review I feel like I want to give it 2,5 stars or something?? So I’m going with 3 official stars because despite my rant I mostly enjoyed reading this.

A few notes before you head into this review: most of the things I write are aspects of this book that I didn’t like. It’s much easier to point those out and rant about them than talk about the things I did like. I don’t think it’s just me, I think it’s a human condition to focus a lot more on the negatives than the positives. So if you don’t want to read anything negative about this book, leave now for your own sake, but know that I did overall like this book. I’ll point out the things I subjectively didn’t like and the things I think are objectively kind of shitty. Also, my tastes have changed a lot in the past year, so if you see my ratings for SJM’s books (they were all five stars at the time I read them) keep in mind that they might not necessarily be true anymore if I re-read those books now.

PLOT:

I think my strengths as a reader and reviewer don’t lie in judging (and summarizing lol) plots, so I’m going to leave it to other readers to do so. All I can say is that I think the plot made sense as a whole. There some slightly dull parts, and especially the beginning at the Spring Court was rather flat. I think we all expected a lot more drama there, and there wasn’t much of it. A lot of the plot was about preparing for war and discovering things/people/creatures that could come in handy once war started. I think some things could have been handled better.
I loved how some things were downright creepy, like Bryaxis, the Bone Carver and Weaver’s backstory, the Ouroboros, Amren’s story…until they weren’t. Come to think of it, her books (I’m extending this to ToG as well) are full of things that are creepy until they’re “humanized” or somehow made less scary. I do like this aspect most of the time but I feel like she might be overusing it a bit. I’d like some things to stay creepy for once.
As for the ending, it made me really emotional in a couple of points. A lot of how the war played out was very plot-device-y, but I’m not complaining about that. And as much as I’m overall happy with the ending, it didn’t seem very realistic.
There’s also a lot of minor loose ends, and I guess those will be addressed in the next books, but I appreciate that this series feels over and the next books will focus on different characters and not Feyre and Rhysand anymore. I think it’s really easy to drop this series now if you’ve been disappointed by it, and I appreciate that she didn’t end with a cliffhanger that would attract more readers to the next book.
As for me, I think I will continue reading this series, despite everything. I really care about the characters and I admit I’m curious about the world and how certain things will come into play (also I’m hoping at some point we’ll see some clear sign of how this and the ToG worlds connect, because afaik SJM said they are connected).

CHARACTERS:

I think SJM writes character really well…for a maximum of 2-3 books. She excels at secondary and side characters (though not in this book so much), but when it comes to MCs she can’t keep them up for more than a couple of installments. Their arcs and development are basically solved, in the case of this series, with ACOMAF.
I still really liked everyone, even when I don’t agree with things they do (see: Mor). If it wasn’t for the characters, I would have probably DNF’d this book pretty early. I only wanted to finish it because I needed to know how certain relationships would (or wouldn’t) develop, and that makes up for most of the disappointment I feel towards this book.

RELATIONSHIPS:

This was partially a mess.

Friendships are very well done in all her books. One thing I’ll always applaud is her way or portraying female friendships in all her books. There’s not enough of that in popular books and it’s such an important thing to have when so many books focus on girls and women being against each other.

However, the romantic relationships kind of sucked, and the problem lies in her writing (which I’ll address more in depth below).
SJM tries to build what she hopes is unresolved sexual tension while doing exactly the opposite. The constant (not) “sexy” comments, the innuendo…they worked the opposite of how SJM intended for them to work. She’s hoping to create chemistry between the characters, but I see none. Literally none. I haven’t re-read ACOMAF, so I don’t know anymore if this applies for that book as well, but here I only knew that Feyre and Rhys had to be a pair because they’re mates etc etc but I saw none of the chemistry and mutual understanding that makes me ship the characters hard. We’re told many times how awesome Rhys is, or maybe I should say that it’s always thrown in our faces. Well, I prefer discovering it for myself by being shown, thank you.
SJM can handle the “get together” part of a romantic relationship pretty well, but she fails at portraying established relationships in an entertaining way. She uses sex as the only way to “keep the ship alive” and entertain the reader when it’s clear that a couple is endgame, and she fails at that.

I don’t really know in what section of this review this should go, but…the sex scenes. The *inhales* sex scenes *exhales*. Just…no. They add nothing to the story. They’re gross. Literally every fanfiction smut I’ve read is better than this. Stop devouring or feasting on people. That’s cannibalism. In general, just stop with all the animalistic language, the purring and shit.
Also I think this is still being published as YA? Which is so wrong. I don’t have ANYTHING against sex in YA books, but it needs to be handled properly. By all means, have a semi-explicit sex scene. But write it delicately. Write it in a way teenagers can identify themselves with. This is not it. Imagine being 16 or 17 and reading this, being told that sex is always animalistic and dirty and can happen literally at any given moment, nevermind that you’ve just killed and seen people being killed in battle merely minutes ago. Seeing weird metaphors being used instead of calling genitals for what they are. How do you not get grossed out? How do you not get scared/disgusted by sex? Hell I’m in my twenties and even I got grossed out.

I’m really sad that SJM chose the path of adding smut to every book she writes since ACOMAF. I’m all for sex-positivity but writing smut doesn’t necessarily mean that. If you do write it, it needs to be well written. This is by no means it. It’s self-indulgent, it’s pure fanservice and I worry about the view of sex it gives younger people.

WRITING:

I definitely grew a lot in the past year as a reader and as a reviewer, and there’s nothing that proves it better than reading an author you used to think was perfect and finding her writing mediocre at best. Wow. More than that, There’s a few things that she definitely used to not do before, and now she does. Like the “no question mark” policy she started to adopt in EoS.
Here’s the thing: stop writing questions without a question mark. You’re not on twitter or tumblr. If you want the question to have a certain feel to it, say, “X said in a flat tone” or something like that. Most of the time, you’ll find that you don’t even need to do that. Readers are intelligent beings and can pick up a mood from the context without you constantly feeding them every.single.thing.

Another thing that she does the whole freaking time is this structure:

verbless sentence + … + sentence referring to the first sentence

Such a structure…that’s only okay once in a while, not every single page (<– see what I did there?)
She also trails off with a lot of her sentences, especially when explaining or pointing out things.

And that’s another problem. She explains and describes too much. She leaves almost nothing to the reader’s imagination, which is also wrong when using a first person PoV. If you pay attention, you’ll see that Feyre seems to describe the faces and expressions of everyone in a room, while also saying that she keeps her gaze upon one single character. Uhm, do you have eyes behind your head, Feyre? How does that work exactly? Well, it doesn’t.

Something that seems to annoy a lot of people are words like “mate” and “male/female”. I don’t find them particularly appealing, but I’ve just accepted that that’s what I’m going to get whenever I read a SJM book. You can find the whole concept of mates stupid or ridiculous I guess, or you can find it beautiful and romantic. I’m right in the middle, in that I don’t really care about it one way or another. I just accept it as part of the world building, like the fact that Fae and magic and other creatures exist, and move on with my life. But I do agree that the word “mate” was often used as a substitute for Rhys’s name when using it wouldn’t even have been a repetition, thus making it really unnecessary. As for male/female, it kind of makes sense because she seems to keep “man” and “woman” for humans, so she needed different words for Fae. I don’t know, it’s not my favorite thing either but I can see how it makes sense.

That’s it for my review, but I want to discuss the LGBT+ REPRESENTATION in this book. I won’t hide anything under spoilers in this section, so if you don’t want to find out about certain characters’ sexuality, stop reading right now.

It’s clear that SJM listened to readers when they wished for more lgbt+ representation. There are a few different points and I hope to touch them all in this review. I’ve been much slower than basically everyone else in reading this book so I guess I’m late to the party, and I didn’t read any discussions while I was reading the book because I wanted to go in the book completely blind. Still, I managed to gather what the main discussion points were:

Is this book acephobic?
I don’t think it inherently is, but if ace people have found this particular sentence

perhaps any sort of physical passion had long ago been drained away, alongside their souls.


harmful, I respect them and their feelings and I’m in no position to tell them they’re wrong. But, from a strictly rational and linguistic point of view, I do not think that that sentence implies a correlation between being soulless and being on the ace spectrum.

Is there LGBT+ representation in this book?
Yes, there is: one secondary character, three side characters and two “barely there” characters are on an LGBT+ spectrum.

Is the LGBT+ rep good?
For the most part, I think it is. I mostly liked how, except for a secondary character, there seemed to be no issue with the fact that someone is gay/lesbian/bi. In both this and the ToG world, same sex relationships are never frowned upon, nobody has anything against anyone for wanting to have sex with whichever gender they want to have sex with. The only problem, that only the secondary character faced, seems to arise when someone is expected to bear children because they need an heir for political/diplomatic reasons.

There is, however, one side character whose sexuality is handled really poorly. Helion, High Lord of the Day Court, is pan/bisexual, and apparently the only way that SJM thought of to show that he likes both (or all) genders, is to have him hit on every single character present at that moment, with very NOT subtle innuendos and straight-up invitations to a threesome/orgy. Right, because bisexuals don’t face enough stereotypes from both straight and homo people, let’s portray them as people who are always horny and always want to have sex with both genders, PREFERABLY at the same time! *rolls eyes* (To be honest, the always-horny seems to be a flaw in SJM’s character description, no matter if straight or bi).
This was honestly really disappointing and I couldn’t believe my eyes when I read that part. It’s truly the only harmful part of this book that I could detect and I freaking hate it. How did nobody tell SJM she needed to edit that whole thing? It wouldn’t have taken much and she could have spared bisexual people yet another disappointment and awful representation.

However, I quite liked how the “coming out” of Mor was handled. As I said before, she seems the only character whose coming out was tough, but it made sense if you’ve read it. I’m not sure if it continued to make sense for five hundred years, and I’m really sad because she treats poor Azriel like shit because she can’t bring herself to being honest with him. The thing is, I don’t have to like everything she does, because I accept it as a (pretty big) character flaw. But flawed characters are my favorite kind of characters, so I still really like her. I think it’s pretty clear that SJM changed Mor’s sexuality between ACOMAF and ACOWAR to adapt to her readers’ demand, so I applaud her for that. I also like that it’s Mor, who is always portrayed as very feminine, to be the one who likes girls more than guys. A lot of people complained that it should have been Amren “because of her physical features”. People, do you even think before you speak/write? Geez.
(Also, I’ve seen someone confused about Mor’s exact labels… I think the terms that would best apply to her would be “bisexual homoromantic”, in case anyone was wondering and/or identifies with Mor’s sexuality but didn’t know the exact words for it. Of course, this is what I got from reading it, but I think it should be pretty accurate.)

“I’m so pissed!!!1! My ship sunk because one character is on the LGBT+ spectrum!!!1!1!!!”
🙂 deal 🙂 with 🙂 it 🙂
Do you know how many ships sink daily because a character is (or usually both characters are) straight? Yeah. So just be sad but don’t take it out on the LGBT+ representation or on the bi character.

 

Well that was long. It seems that I can either post no reviews at all or one really long-ass one with no in-between.

Anyway, I’d love to hear everyone’s opinion on this book, especially regarding the discussion part!

ARC review: Flame in the Mist by Renee Ahdieh

I was provided an early copy of this by Netgalley but all opinions are my own.

23308087
★★✩✩

I really liked some parts but other ones either didn’t make any sense or they were just boring. The only reason I hurried to finish this was so I could be free to read something else and because being in a BR I felt motivated to keep up with my BR partner, but most of the time all I wanted to do was…basically anything that wasn’t reading this.

It was a story with so much potential that I can’t help but feel really sad and disappointed because some things were very poorly executed in my opinion.

Let’s start with Mariko’s character. We’re told she is really smart and clever, and within the book she “invents” shuriken, grenades (?) and possibly other things that I was too confused to really get, but we actually aren’t shown how intelligent she is. Ahdieh deliberately decides to have Mariko invent those things but as a reader that didn’t affect my perception of her as a rather bland character, and not a particularly smart at that.

From her reasons to stay with the Black Clan (so that she could…somehow save her name from “shame” in her family’s eyes…by camping with a group of men…mmh okaaay?) to her acceptance of things that she should probably have questioned (the animal in the forest?), she did not read like a very smart character.

She only shines with a couple of important quotes, but those aren’t enough to make me love the book (or her character as a whole). Still, it’s important for younger readers to see these messages in a book.

I will not be bandied about by men any longer. I am not a prize to be bought or sold.

Was is always necessary for boys to prove they knew more than anyone else around them?

She remembered Chiyo telling her that finding one’s match was like finding one’s other half. Mariko had never understood the notion. She was not a half. She was wholly her own.

Something else I liked was how the other few female characters were portrayed.

Mariko nudged the handle of her spoon with a bound fingertip. “Are you ever angry you were born a woman?”
Yumi sat back on her heels and studied Mariko for a spell. “I’ve never been angry to have been born a woman. There have been times I’ve been angry at how the world treats us, but I see being a woman as a challenge I must fight. Like being born under a stormy sky. Some people are lucky enough to be born on a bright summer’s day. Maybe we were born under clouds. No wind. No rain. Just a mountain of clouds we must climb each morning so that we may see the sun.”

Among the many things I would have liked to see, was Mariko and Kenshin’s relationship. Siblings’ relationships are one of the things I most enjoy reading about since I’m an only child, and since Mariko and Kenshin are twins I was hoping to get a lot of their relationship. Even though they don’t really interact in the book since they are separated, we get a few hints of how their relationship and their differences might be, but not enough to make me feel whether or not they have a strong bond or not. So this is another reason why I’m disappointed in this book. I’m sure it will be explored more in the second book, but I wish it had been built earlier on.

Another thing that completely failed in my eyes (and it was probably the worst aspect of this book for me) is the romance. At first, I didn’t see who the romance was going to be about. I had some ideas and I was wrong about my first thoughts (don’t worry though, there’s no love triangle). I was actually hoping that for once there would be no romance (even though I’m a sucker for it), because I didn’t really ship anyone. Well,that’s not entirely true, since I did ship a couple that ended up being just a brotp.

(I haven’t seen anyone complain about Ahdieh’s lack of LGBT+ portrayal even though there was none in this or, as far as I remember, in TWATD. I’d be interested to know why we only “attack” certain authors but not others for this, but that’s a discussion that I don’t feel like having in a review)

Anyway, there was no romance for most part of this book, and then it just…was there. And I didn’t feel it. Not only was I not given time to ship it, it also felt boring and I didn’t like how it suddenly happened.

The romance and the discovery of Mariko’s gender are two things that go hand in hand in the book, and it’s something that bothered me endlessly. The way Mariko was finally found out was so over-used and unimaginative that I just couldn’t believe my eyes. There was a lot of potential there and it just vanished within half a scene. I’m so disappointed and pissed. I’d say more but without the option to hide spoilers I don’t want to, though you can read this review on goodreads if you want to open that spoiler tag.

Reading the rest of the romantic plot I felt like I had to turn a blind eye to the fact that I hated the way it developed. Again, there were a couple more nice quotes,

“You are first and foremost a person. A reckless, foolish person, but a person nonetheless. If I ever say you are not permitted to do something, rest assured that the last reason I would ever say so would be because you are a girl.”

but I never loved it.

The world building felt quite genuine (although many Japanese terms were used without an explanation – at least not in the ARC version. I think the published book will have some sort of summary at the end like TWATD) but I didn’t get the use of the magic. It was very similar in this to TWATD but it bothered me more. We’re shown a glimpse of magic that is never explained and just confused me. I’m sure it will be explored more in the next book but I don’t like this approach.

I think it’s still worth to give this book a try if you loved TWATD. I might request the ARC of the next book whenever it’s on Netgalley but I don’t think I’ll be purchasing it with my money.

Cover reveal + ARC Giveaway: The Dragons of Nova by Elise Kova

Today Elise Kova and Rockstar Book Tours are revealing the cover for THE DRAGONS OF NOVA, which releases July 11, 2017!
Check out the gorgeous cover and enter to win assigned ARC of the book!!
On to the reveal! 
 
 
Title: THE
DRAGONS OF NOVA (Loom Saga #2)
Author: Elise Kova
Pub. Date: July 11, 2017
Publisher: Keymaster Press
Formats: Hardcover,
eBook, audiobook
Pages: 488
Find it: Amazon | B&N | TBD | Goodreads
Cvareh returns home to his sky world of Nova with the genius crafter Arianna as his temperamental guest. The mercurial inventor possesses all the Xin family needs to turn the tides of a centuries-old power struggle, but the secrets she harbors must be earned with trust — hard to come by for Ari, especially when it comes to Dragons. On Nova, Ari finds herself closer to exacting vengeance against the traitor who killed everything — and everyone – she once loved. But before Ari can complete her campaign of revenge, the Crimson Court exposes her shadowed past and reveals something even more dangerous sparking between her and Cvareh.
 
While Nova is embroiled in blood sport and political games, the rebels on Loom prepare for an all-out assault on their Dragon oppressors. Florence unexpectedly finds herself at the forefront of change, as her unique blend of skills — and quick-shooting accuracy — makes her a force to be reckoned with. For the future of her world, she vows vengeance against the Dragons.
 
Before the rebellion can rise, though, the Guilds must fall.
 
Exclusive Excerpt!
“They’re coming from the front!” Nora screamed over the crescendo of the engine gaining speed. On cue, the train lurched as an endwig was splattered to a bloody mess on the point of the engine’s pilot.
 
“Bloody cogs,” Florence cursed. The Vicar Alchemist had sent her to protect the mission as the Revolver, but one of her wasn’t going to be enough. “I’m going to the engine.”
 
“What are we going to do?” The usually self-sure Nora had the face of a cornered hare.
 
“You’re going to fight.” Florence passed her a weapon.
 
“I’ve never shot a gun before.”
 
“Now is a great time to learn.”
 
“I’m an Alchemist!”
 
Seriously, Florence was a breath away from shooting the woman herself. “You’re dead if you don’t adapt! There’s three more bombs exactly like the ones you just used, right there. Just fend them off until the train gets up to speed. But don’t use any other disks.”
 
Florence had no more time to waste as the train lurched again. They just had to survive until the train reached full speed. For all the endwig were, they certainly couldn’t keep up with a locomotive.
 
She hoped.
 
The wind whipped her hair around her face as she stuck her head from the train car. Florence reached out for the ladder to the right of the door, scaling up before another endwig could emerge.
She swung up just in time as an explosion nearly blew her foot clean off.
 
“By the five guilds, you two only had three bombs!” she screamed over the wind, not knowing if they could hear. “Ration them a bit!”
 
Standing, Florence looked in horror at the tracks ahead. Dozens of endwig lined the path, running eagerly to meet the train. She loaded six canisters at once.
 
Jumping to the tender, Florence lost her footing atop the moving train car. A nail snapped clean off as she sought a grip that would prevent her from being thrown to certain death. If she fell now, she would never get back on the vessel. She’d be torn limb from limb.
 
Gritting her teeth, Florence rose to her knees, shooting two endwig in the process. She wedged herself between two grooves on the top of the tender. Blood pooled around her shins as she dug them into the metal for a grip where there was none, but she was stable enough to take aim, and that meant she could open fire.
 
Five shots down, and Florence reloaded her gun. Endwig came relentlessly like a never ending nightmare. But the train didn’t gain any more speed. She repeated the process, waiting for the vessel to be like her bullets, whizzing through the night at deadly speeds.
 
“Anders, now would be a great time to open her up!” she screamed.
 
There was no reply.
 
“Anders, Rotus, we need speed, get us out of here faster!”
 
Five long claws curled around the door of the engine in answer. Florence watched in horror as the white silhouette of an endwig, dotted in the black blood of a Chimera, pulled itself from the engine room. Florence swallowed hard.
 
They were without Rivet and Raven, stumbling through the darkness, enemies at all sides. She raised her gun slowly, looking fearlessly at the face of death itself. Her revolver was steady over the rocking of the train.
 
“You think I’m not used to this?” Her mouth curled into a mad grin. “I’ve been fighting my way out of the darkness my whole life. And you’re not going to stop me now.”
 
Gunshots echoed through the forest.
About Elise: 
Elise Kova has always had a profound
love of fantastical worlds. Somehow, she managed to focus on the real world
long enough to graduate with a Master’s in Business Administration before
crawling back under her favorite writing blanket to conceptualize her next
magic system. She currently lives in St. Petersburg, Florida, and when she is
not writing can be found playing video games, watching anime, or talking with
readers on social media. She is the USA Today bestselling author of the Air
Awakens Series as well as the Loom Saga (Keymaster, 2017).
 
 
 
 

Giveaway Details:
(1) winner will receive a signed
advanced readers copy of THE DRAGONS OF NOVA.

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