ARC Review: The Queen of Rhodia (Tales of Inthya #3) by Effie Calvin

I was sent this book as an advanced copy by the publisher via NetGalley for reviewing purposes, but all opinions are my own. 

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It has been sixteen months since Princess Esofi arrived in Ieflaria, and eight since her marriage to Crown Princess Adale. The princesses have a peaceful life together, preparing to become co-regents and raising their baby dragon, Carinth.

Their peace is shattered when Esofi’s mother, Queen Gaelle of Rhodia, arrives in Birsgen. She has heard about Carinth and believes that she deserves custody of him due to her greater devotion to Talcia, Goddess of Magic.

Adale and Esofi have no intention of giving up their son, but Gaelle is impossible to reason with—and there’s no telling what lengths she’ll go to in order to get what she wants.

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★★★★.5✩

I was so proud to see that the few minor issues I had with the first installment of this series were completely absent here. Not to brag but I KNEW IT and I love seeing that I was right about the writer’s potential.

So, our main characters Esofi and Adale got married and are now in an established relationship and dealing with their dragon son and with the political repercussions of The Things That Happened in book one. Of course Esofi’s mother, who is a fucking abusive bitch, enters the picture and stirs trouble. Plot happens, they’re still gay, the MCs from book two have cameos and they’re also gay, everything’s good, the end.

In all seriousness, I loved how this book dealt with pretty much everything. I knew it was going to be tough to read because of the abuse that Esofi went through her whole life and because she was forced to deal with her mother again. I wouldn’t say that any of that particular plot line was, strictly speaking, pleasant to read, and it didn’t offer me personallyany sort of closure because of the particular abuse dynamics here, but I know it will help another victim of abuse out there, and I’m so glad.

I don’t usually care for established relationship conflict in most cases, but here I thought it was done so well and so delicately. I’m really grateful to Effie Calvin for giving this couple their well-deserved sequel and exploring things we usually don’t get to see in get-together romances.

I don’t know what else to say except that I loved this and that I’m going to pick up book two as soon as I can (yes, I know, I suck, but in my defense this was perfectly understandable without having read book 2 since it followed the couple from book one, okay).

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LGBTQIAP+ Books that Don’t Feature AlloCis M/M Relationships, Part 2

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find part 1 here🌈

 

Hey friends! Pride month is here!!! This post is a bit later than I would have liked but with real life keeping me busy I’m only now managing to post it. With pride month come a lot of really cool readathons that are a perfect opportunity to branch out and read more diversely, whether you already read a lot of queer books throughout the year or not.

So I remembered I wrote this post last year with the same title as this one, and I thought since I’ve read a lot more books in the meantime I would update this list so y’all don’t end up only reading the same allocis m/m romances that, frankly, don’t make your reading very diverse.

(PS: see also my F/F romance recs from last year)

So, what are “LGBTQIAP+ books that don’t feature allocis m/m relationships”?

Basically anything where the focus isn’t two allo and cis men in a m/m relationship. This varies from m/m where one of the main characters is trans or asexual or aromantic, to a m/f romance where one (or both!) are bi or pan or queer, to f/f, to f/nonbinary, etc etc. They can also be books with queer characters that don’t have any romance in it! I’m also only going to mention books where at least one queer character has a POV or is the love interest or is otherwise very prominent. And these are all books I’ve read and enjoyed or at least thought that the queer rep was good (although obviously I can’t speak for a whole community). So let’s get right into it!

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🏳️‍🌈 Not M/M:

Far From the Tree by Robin Benway – f/f romance; lesbian character; family/sibling focus | YA | my review

Toil & Truble (anthology) – various queer characters, among which many f/f romances and m/f | YA | my review

An Unkindness of Ghosts by Rivers Solomon – fantasy, nonbinary/nonbinary romance (not a big focus); autistic intersex MC | Adult

Shootaround by Suspu – webcomic, different relationships including f/f, polyam f/f/f, m/f with a trans character, m/m in the past, and basically everyone is queer | YA

Under the Lights by Dahlia Adler – f/f romance, lesbian MC, bisexual LI | YA | my review

The Princess and the Fangirl by Ashley Poston – contemporary f/f romance | YA | my review

On The Fly by P.J. Trebelhorn – contemporary f/f romance | Adult | my review

Once Ghosted, Twice Shy by Alyssa Cole – contemporary f/f romance | NA

Into the Drowning Deep by Mira Grant – sci-fi horror, f/f romance, autistic lesbian and bisexual characters | NA/Adult | my review

Graham’s Delicacies by Em Ali – f/nonbinary, m/m, m/nonbinary romances | NA | my review

The Afterward by E.K. Johnston – fantasy f/f romance | YA

Proud by Juno Dawson – anthology with different types of queer character and relationships (although a disappointing lack of ace/aro characters) | YA | my review

The Weight of the Stars by K. Ancrum – contemporary f/f romance | YA | my review

The Stars are Legion by Kameron Hurley – fantasy f/f romance, all lesbian cast | Adult | my review

Ms Martin’s Incomparable Adventure by Courtney Milan – historical f/f romance | Adult

The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon – fantasy f/f romance; multiple queer characters | Adult

Her Royal Highness by Rachel Hawkins – contemporary f/f; multiple queer side characters | YA | my review

The Queen of Rhodia by Effie Calvin – fantasy, established f/f couple | NA

Never-Contented Things by Sarah Porter – fantasy, f/f romance (I think they’re both bi) + pansexual character | YA | I haven’t written a review for this yet but please, please, please, don’t go into this book without knowing what you’re getting yourself into. Massive trigger warnings for emotional abuse, incest, neglect, sexual assault, death, body horror.

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🌈 M/M but not allocis:

Pisces Hooks Taurus by Anyta Sunday – contemporary m/m; demisexual character | NA | my review

Squared Away by Annabeth Albert – contemporary m/m; ace character| Adult | my review

Stake Sauce by RoAnna Sylver – urban fantasy, m/m (with a hint of polyamory) with trans and aro/ace character| NA

The Past and Other Things that Should Stay Buried by Shaun David Hutchinson – contemporary, m/m romance (not the focus of the book though) with a trans character| YA

The Perfect Assassin by K.A. Doore – fantasy, ace main character | NA

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🏳️‍🌈 M/F but at least one of them is queer:

Sweet on the Greek by Talia Hibbert – contemporary m/f romance; bisexual main character| NA

Tash Hearts Tolstoy by Kathryn Ormsbee – contemporary m/f romance; ace character| YA

Every Heart a Doorway by Seanan McGuire – fantasy, (only hinted at) m/f romance; ace MC + trans character| YA

King Of Fools by Amanda Foody – m/f romance; bisexual main character; brief m/m and side f/f | YA | my review

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🌈 No romance/romance not the focus or not resolved:

Vengeful by V.E. Schwab – ace main character| Adult

I Was Born For This by Alice Oseman – trans and gay main character| YA

The Disasters by M.K. England – sci-fi, no actual romance I guess but kind of somewhat of a m/f vs m/m love triangle (bisexual character), plus trans side character| YA | my review

The Gilded Wolves by Roshani Chokshi – fantasy, kind of a m/f vs m/m love triangle, bi or pan characters, but the romance is not resolved yet| YA | my review

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🏳️‍🌈 Not sure if they belong on this list so I’m going to write them in a tiny font:

The Wicker King by K. Ancrum – m/m/f romance with heavy focus on the m/m side | YA 

No End by Erly and Kromi – there’s prominent m/m romances but all main characters are queer (ace, bi, pan, trans and lesbian, and more to come because the comic is ongoing) | YA | my review

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And this is it for this post. I really hope this is helpful and it inspires some of you who want to diversify your queer reading, and tackle those pride month challenges and readathons.

Happy pride month y’all, and remember to celebrate all the colors and all the letters of the rainbow ❤️🧡💛💚💙💜

Release Blitz: Prince of Killers (Fog City #1) by Layla Reyne

Hey friends! Join me to celebrate the release of the first book in a new mystery series by Layla Reyne, which I can’t wait to start ASAP.

Prince of Killers Ebook

 

Series: Fog City #1

Publisher: Layla Reyne (Self-Published)

Release Date (Print & Ebook): June 10, 2019

Length (Print & Ebook): 216 pages (52K words)

Subgenre: M/M Romantic Suspense

Warnings: Explicit sex including mild kink; explicit language; violence; instances and/or discussion of homophobia; off-page instances and/or discussion of PTSD, drug use, and abuse of minor characters.

 All buy links or pre-order links

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No indiscriminate killing. No collateral damage. No unvetted targets.

These are the rules Hawes Madigan lives by. Rules that make being Fog City’s Prince of Killers bearable. Soon, he’ll be king—of an organization of assassins—and the crown has never felt heavier. Until the mysterious Dante Perry swaggers into his life.

Dante looks like a rock god and carries himself like one too, all loose-limbed and casually confident. He also carries a concealed weapon, a private investigator’s license, and a message for the prince. Someone inside Hawes’s organization is out to kill the future king.

In the chaos that follows the timely warning, Hawes comes to depend on Dante. On his skills as an investigator, on the steadiness he offers, and on their moments alone when Hawes lets Dante take control. As alliances are tested and traitors exposed, Hawes needs Dante at his back and in his bed. But if the PI ever learns Hawes’s darkest secret, Hawes is sure to get a knife to the heart—and a bullet to the brain—instead.

There’s no shortage of twists and turns in this new romantic suspense trilogy from Layla Reyne. Prince of Killers is book one of three. Fair warning: buckle up, cliffhangers ahead!

 Praise for Prince of Killers:

“Layla Reyne is an auto-buy author for me. She writes it; I devour it. Prince of Killers is an amazing start to a new series. It’s fast-paced and intriguing with the perfect balance of action, passion, and plot twists I’ve come to expect from her books. Layla never disappoints, and I can’t wait to see what happens next in her Fog City series.”  – Aimee Nicole Walker, Bestselling author of the Curl Up and Dye Mysteries

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“Layla Reyne redefined what a family of assassins looks like with “Prince of Killers.” The “Fog City” series kicks off with some mind-blowing twists and I can’t wait to see what happens next.” – Jeff Adams, Big Gay Fiction Podcast

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Teaser

Hawes had grown up in San Francisco, had been born and bred in its hills and valleys. He’d learned at an early age how to turn a car’s wheels when parked on a slope and how to perfectly time the release of the clutch and the press of the gas so as not to roll the wrong way down Jones Street. He would never, however, get used to cruising his hometown’s hills on a motorcycle, not his sister’s and certainly not Dante Perry’s. And he most definitely would not get used to riding tandem, when one wrong bump could jostle him loose and send him flailing to his death.

By the time they rumbled onto the stone drive of the sage-green Victorian with its high-pitched roofs and bright-white trim, Hawes had mentally uttered more Hail Marys than he had the Sunday after he’d blown the homecoming king. He wished he could say he’d been holding tight to Dante as an excuse to map out every nook and cranny of his ripped torso, but regrettably, he hadn’t thought beyond a death grip for survival until after he’d climbed off the bike. At which point, managing to stand on his embarrassingly unsteady legs took precedence.

Assassinate people for a living, no problem. Run a multimillion-dollar company before age thirty, can do. Ride a motorcycle in San Francisco, fuck no.

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About Layla Reyne: RITA Finalist Layla Reyne is the author of the Agents Irish and Whiskey, Trouble Brewing, and Changing Lanes series. A Carolina Tar Heel who now calls the San Francisco Bay Area home, Layla enjoys weaving her bi-coastal experiences into her stories, along with adrenaline-fueled suspense and heart-pounding romance. She is a member of Romance Writers of America and its Kiss of Death and Rainbow Romance Writers chapters. Layla is a 2019 RWA® RITA® Finalist in Contemporary Romance (Mid-Length) and 2016 RWA® Golden Heart® Finalist in Romantic Suspense.

 Connect with Layla: FB GroupFB | IGNewsletter | Amazon  | Bookbub

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Get to know more about Layla Reyne in this fun Release Blitz Q&A!

  • If you listen to music while writing, share your playlist with us!

For this series (Fog City), it’s been a lot of Hozier, Kaleo, Bishop Briggs, Alex Clare, and Rodrigo y Gabriela. Up-tempo, moody stuff with heavy bass beats.

  • What are you reading now?

I’ve been working on Fog City #2, so while writing romantic suspense, I stick to reading contemporary romance. These are a few of my recent favorites!

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  • What was the highlight of writing Prince of Killers?

The last line. * Evil cackle *

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Giveaway (Enter to win 2 sets of signed backlist paperbacks (Trouble Brewing or Changing Lanes, winner’s choice); if international, signed book plates!)

***Get Phenomenal Romantic Suspense by Layla Reyne on Sale!***
Carina Press has CRAFT BREW on sale for the month of June at only $1.99!

Audiobook Review: Her Royal Highness by Rachel Hawkins /// royal f/f romance in Scotland

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Summary: Millie Quint is devastated when she discovers that her sort-of-best friend/sort-of-girlfriend has been kissing someone else. And because Millie cannot stand the thought of confronting her ex every day, she decides to apply for scholarships to boarding schools . . . the farther from Houston the better.

Millie can’t believe her luck when she’s accepted into one of the world’s most exclusive schools, located in the rolling highlands of Scotland. Everything about Scotland is different: the country is misty and green; the school is gorgeous, and the students think Americans are cute.

The only problem: Mille’s roommate Flora is a total princess.

She’s also an actual princess. Of Scotland.

At first, the girls can barely stand each other–Flora is both high-class and high-key–but before Millie knows it, she has another sort-of-best-friend/sort-of-girlfriend. Even though Princess Flora could be a new chapter in her love life, Millie knows the chances of happily ever afters are slim . . . after all, real life isn’t a fairy tale . . . or is it?

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★★★★.5✩

I devoured this book on audio in basically a day and oh my god, friends. There is a very specific emotion that us sapphic girls feel when presented with good sapphic content in fiction, and depending on our tastes in terms of tropes and genres, different sapphic books will hit us differently. The feeling I got from this book was one of pure joy from getting a royal romance, usually reserved for a girl falling in love with a prince, starring two girls.

I loved Millie, the protagonist, right away. She’s smart and she wants to be a geologist!!! She wants to go to a school in Scotland and part of the reason why she loves Scotland is because of its cool geology. Not to be so me, but give me any girl protagonist who’s a scientist or wants to be one and I’ll immediately be ten times more invested in her story. Also, her interest wasn’t just mentioned once in passing, it’s actually pretty much present throughout the book and she has her own collection of minerals and rocks (I do too!! okay, technically my mom does, but that’s not the point) and UGH I love her so much okay!! I have no actual idea how accurate some of the things she said were. Since I was on audiobook I didn’t feel like pausing every time and google or ask my mom if the geology stuff was correct BUT whatever, I appreciate the sentiment in any case (and if you’re a geologist don’t @ me I’m just here for a fun gay time). Okay now I made it sound like this is way more about geology than it actually is, but no, it’s just I feel very strongly about geology so pardon me.

After a brief introduction to Millie’s family and friends back home, she gets to Scotland and we get that Hogwarts-y feeling of arriving to a place you know very little about (despite all the research Millie has done) and having to navigate through a new school and new people, most of which are filthy rich or straight up aristocrats. Among which is HRH Flora and, surprise surprise, Millie’s roommate.

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Their relationship can only be described as hate to love, as it often is when the couple starts off as roommates. Only after weeks of forced vicinity Millie’s perception of Flora starts to change, and I think although we don’t get Flora’s POV, the same could be said for her. I don’t want to wander too much into headcanons, but I believe that Flora started to view Millie under a new light after Millie’s coming out, and I found that such a realistic experience for sapphic people.

Speaking of coming outs, there were two, in two separate moments (Millie’s, which we know about since the very first page, but she comes out to her new friends in the school – she’s bi, and Flora’s, who is gay), and they both warmed my heart so much because of how they were handled. There’s also a “wait, you’re straight???” moment for one of the side characters that had me laughing for hours (okay, not literally but I have to laugh whenever I remember it). (No, don’t worry, there was no queerbait.)

While I wouldn’t call this book super diverse as a whole, it does deliver on casual queerness and on people never making a big deal out of it. I really appreciated both aspects and how much a non-issue it all was, I really felt like it was a book written for queer people instead of just about them, you know? ♥

Back to the romance, I loved Millie and Flora’s relationship. You can’t help but hate Flora in the beginning but by the end you’re almost as in love with her as Millie is (okay, not sure that’s possible actually). They got such cute and cliché romantic moments and they were TO DIE for. Twentybiteen is giving us such sapphic goodness!!!!

Anyway it’s been a while since a full-on gush review and I usually don’t really review audiobooks because those are the books I read purely for fun without reviewing in mind, but I couldn’t not talk about this. I went into it only for a good sapphic time and it never ever disappointed me.

I do want to say that if you’re expecting this to be completely realistic you should maybe change your mindset a little before you start reading. Yes, we all know there is no queen of Scotland and therefore no princess of Scotland. Maybe the blurb should make it more clear that it’s a fictional/alternate Scotland, but that’s hardly the first book series that does something like this. Of course, that’s easy for me to say because I’ve never been and I have no ties to Scotland, but I understand not liking the idea of changing things for the sake of the book. You do you and while it never bothered me I wanted to mention this aspect.

Another brief note for those who want to read this but haven’t read the first book in the series yet, go for it! I haven’t read book one either and as you can see I loved this book. It follows different characters and we do get to see the protagonists from the first installment (one of which is Flora’s older brother), but the book pretty much explains everything and we’re not left wondering who these people are. And if you’ve read book one and want to see them again, well read this book!

In conclusion, I don’t think this book is perfect, and if it hadn’t been f/f maybe I wouldn’t have liked it so much, but as you can see I loved it so much and I had such a good time reading it. I 100% recommend it to everyone!

TWs: mentions of loss of a parent in the past, mention of casual homophobia (“it’s just a phase”), several instances of “more than friends”(not challenged), sort of cheating (not the main couple).

ARC Review: King of Fools (The Shadow Game #2) by Amanda Foody

I was sent this book as an advanced copy by the publisher via NetGalley for reviewing purposes, but all opinions are my own. 

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Summary: Indulge your vices in the City of Sin, where a sinister street war is brewing and fame is the deadliest killer of them all…

On the quest to find her missing mother, prim and proper Enne Salta became reluctant allies with Levi Glaisyer, the city’s most famous con man. Saving his life in the Shadow Game forced Enne to assume the identity of Seance, a mysterious underworld figure. Now, with the Chancellor of the Republic dead and bounties on both their heads, she and Levi must play a dangerous game of crime and politics…with the very fate of New Reynes at stake.

Thirsting for his freedom and the chance to build an empire, Levi enters an unlikely partnership with Vianca Augustine’s estranged son. Meanwhile, Enne remains trapped by the mafia donna’s binding oath, playing the roles of both darling lady and cunning street lord, unsure which side of herself reflects the truth.

As Enne and Levi walk a path of unimaginable wealth and opportunity, new relationships and deadly secrets could quickly lead them into ruin. And when unforeseen players enter the game, they must each make an impossible choice: To sacrifice everything they’ve earned in order to survive…

Or die as legends.

Release date: out now!

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★★★★

King of Fools was one of my most anticipated sequels this year and I was not disappointed. Am I mad a this book and at Amanda Foody? Oh, hell yes. But I loved every second of it.

I believe that, in trilogies, second books should feel completely different from book one, and then book three should be an expansion of book two. We’ll see what book three has in store for us, but for now I can say that this book had a totally different feeling from Ace of Shades, and it was great.

Different were the themes, the stakes, the pacing, the POVs. We saw old and new characters in a different light, and the city of New Reynes took its own rightful place as almost a character of its own, with its rich history and legends, even more so than in the first installment.

This book is so rich and full of events, each leading to new and more complicated plot points, that it’s impossible to put it down. Even if you somehow weren’t hooked to the plot, the characters are so interesting and you love them so much that you can’t not keep reading.

Structurally speaking, KoF has two main differences: three POVs (Enne, Levi, Jac) and a both faster and slower pace. Faster because a lot more happens than in Ace, but spread out over several months instead of the ten days of Ace. I think that was necessary, although if we were to analyze it, some time skips were a little too convenient maybe, but I don’t care too much about that. It all flowed well and came together nicely (OR SHOULD I SAY NOT NICELY) for the grand finale.

If you’ve read Ace, you know how much Enne grew in those pages, and here we see the lovely results of that. Mainly we get to see Enne form her own girl gang and it’s everything you’ve ever needed in your life. I really appreciated the variety of girls there, even though obviously there needed to be a focus on only a few of them. Also, there was a lovely side f/f relationship and I’m ready to see more of it in the sequel.

While Enne changed a lot in a short time, Levi’s character development in Ace had more to do with our perception of him the longer we stayed in his head. In KoF, I think it’s fair to say that Levi does quite a bit of character development in the way that usually male characters (and men in general) do: his development is always the result of something that happens, usually something he regrets doing after seeing the consequences it had. I found this both realistic and frustrating at times, but in a way that was always consistent with who he was since the beginning of Ace.

Levi’s development was also integrated by an outside perspective, mainly Jac’s POV, into his flaws, but that’s not all Jac was there for, which was something I was afraid of at the beginning. I’m glad we saw Jac have his own story line and his own agenda, and I loved his POV so much. Jac’s POV also had one of the most terrifying scenes I’ve ever read, that literally had me forget to breathe while I was reading and I won’t easily forget. I just want to say: Jac Mardlin, I am so fucking proud of you.

I think the writing also did improve, and there were a couple of scenes like the one I just talked about that proved it, as well as certain……..decisions that Amanda Foody took. I am now equally excited and terrified for the sequel, because King of Fools was already a lot in terms of emotional wreckage.

In case it wasn’t clear, I FREAKING LOVED THIS BOOK AND I NEED BOOK 3 ASAP.

TWs: mention of drug abuse and addiction, character deaths, violence, blood, explosions, murder, torture, executions.

#T5W: Favorite Friends in Sci-Fi and Fantasy

Top Five Wednesday is a book meme that Lainey started and I discovered through the lovely Samantha‘s videos. If you’re interested you can join the goodreads group to get the topics for each week.

This week’s topic:

May 15th: SFF BFFs -BooktubeSFF Awards Crossover Topic-
— Discuss your favorite friends in Scifi and Fantasy, or characters you’d be BFFs with.

I could do a whole different post about characters I’d be BFF with (and maybe I will) and since the prompt doesn’t specify and I feel very strongly about groups of friends in fiction, for this post I’m only going to talk about my favorite friend squads (three or more friends) because that’s a trope that gives me life.

Fair disclaimer, this list is 100% queer but it’s also so white it pisses me off. That’s totally on me and I need to do better.

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In Other Lands

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This is the only trio out of this list and I’m not sure it even counts as a squad (maybe a squad is four+ people? idk) but I decided to give my own definition of squad because I couldn’t not talk about Elliot, Luke and Serene. One of the best things is that this book takes place over several years, and it’s basically a huge character study for Elliot. We see him grow up from when he’s 13 until he’s 17 and of course the way he interacts with everyone, including his best friends, changes over time. And they’re all so precious you can’t help but whip out those adoption papers as soon as you meet them (also, please read this book? You would make me very happy. And you’d also be happy because that’s what this book does. It’s a win-win, really).

 

Shades of Magic

I almost didn’t put this here because I feel like we get to know pairs dynamics first (Kell with Rhy, Kell with Lila, Lila with Rhy, Lila with Alucard, Alucard with Rhy, Alucard with Kell) and only later we see them (+ Holland) interact as an actual squad in different occasions. But the fact that the single relationships were developed/lay out before we even get to those good squad moments makes all the difference and gives so much more to think about while you’re away from the books and just thinking about these characters. I 100% love every single one of them and their dynamics.

 

The Raven Cycle

For many reasons I don’t love putting this series here, but when it comes to squad dynamics this automatically comes to mind. The Gangsey is just the best element of these books and I’m so mad that this is stealing the spot I could have given a less well-known series, but I wanted to be honest.

 

Six of Crows

I know this is going to be on everyone’s list, but it’s well deserved. One of the elements where Leigh Bardugo shines is writing squads. She already showed that in Ruin and Rising and it was only confirmed when she wrote the Dregs.

 

Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard

Last but definitely not least. It’s so hard to rank these but if I had to say which one is my actual favorite, this is definitely it. I think it’s a mix of it being genuinely one of the best squads dynamics there is and that feeling of nostalgia I’ve had since I read this trilogy (and that hasn’t left me even after rereading). Even though I only read this one and a half years ago for the first time and not as a child, this is probably to me what Percy Jackson is to most people, and I am at any given time this close to rereading it.

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Who are your favorite friends or squads in books? Do you live vicariously through book friendships like I do? 

 

ARC Mini-review: Pomegranate Seeds by Melissa Jennings

I was sent this book by the author as an advanced copy for reviewing purposes, but all opinions are my own. 

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Summary: A collection of 6 poems about finding out how much the heart can take and where it truly belongs. The poetry collection also explores the author’s personal journey towards realising that they are polyamorous.

This micro-chapbook discusses polyamphobia, internalised polyamphobia, sexual imagery, and emotional self-harm.

Release date: June 21st

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★★★★.5✩

This short poetry book features poems about the author’s experience being polyamorous.

Like with all personal poems, it’s not easy to talk about them if you don’t share the same life experiences or identity, but even without being able to relate to them on a personal level, and even as someone who doesn’t read much poetry lately (and generally doesn’t have much experience reading poetry in English), I loved the imagery used and I could really feel the author’s feelings coming to life on page.

Short review for a short book, but I think polyam people will be able to find a piece of themselves here more than I could, and everyone else will be able to enjoy (and discover, if this is your first work by Melissa Jennings) the author’s vivid style.